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Monday, March 11, 2013

Into the woods

by Ben



Throughout our time in Ghana we had heard people talking about and recommending we visit Mole National Park and so last week the whole of the ICS Ghana team got together to see just what all the fuss was about. Cramming into our little bus, kindly lent to us (driver included) by our host charity, we set off on a 200km journey down 'Death Road' to see Ghana's premier tourist attraction: elephants.

The Mole Motel and its swimming pool and restaurant are pretty nice, all the rooms have air-conditioning and there's western food on the menu. The restaurant and swimming pool overlook a watering hole used regularly by the elephants and you often see baboons and warthogs poking their noses around. You can sit and enjoy your breakfast,watch the elephants bathing in the water and have a cheeky dip in the pool yourself before nipping back to your air-conditioned room and heading out on your safari. Sounds great doesn't it? Not to us. Being the first ICS team in Ghana has empowered us with feeling of being intrepid explorers - we're path finders, we're trend setters, we're reckless and we're out of control . Letting our guinea pig instincts take over, we turned our nose up at the luxury on offer and we opted to stay in Mole's treehouse. Air-conditioning is for the weak. Real adventurers sleep under the stars.

[caption id="attachment_380" align="alignleft" width="279"]Mole treehouse Mole National Park treehouse Real adventurers sleep under the stars...[/caption]

To be honest we had no idea what we were signing up for. We'd found out about the treehouse through word of mouth. There's no website for Mole and our attempts to find out about the treehouse online resulted in some nondescript blogs and a picture of a staircase. When phoning Mole, the whole arrangement for booking it seemed so casual that we weren't even entirely confident that we wouldn't turn up and find another group claiming they'd also booked it. Like Robert Scott and Sir Ranulph Fiennes before us, we pushed on in the face of doubt and uncertainty.

[caption id="attachment_382" align="alignright" width="300"]Mole treehouse maximum 10 people 10, 12... what's the difference?[/caption]

What we found out in the jungle was a treehouse befitting my childish aspirations, although it explicitly said it held only 10 people. According to the person on the phone, though, they've had up to 19 in it before, so we persevered; surely our band of 12 (including the guide who stayed overnight with us) would not be the straw that breaks the camel's back? Being the organised group that we are, we had brought foam to sleep on, so we didn't need to take up the offer of ground mats - and we threw caution to the wind and opted against putting up mosquito nets, which we'd brought with us but were also available to hire.

[caption id="attachment_383" align="alignleft" width="300"]Mole treehouse sleeping platform Plenty of room for everyone![/caption]

The guide told us that if we were quiet would be able to hear baboons, hyenas and all manner of creatures in the night; All I could hear was one of our team leaders snoring and incessant laughter, which no doubt scared away anything in ear shot. The treehouse itself has a raised central 'table' which can double up as a sleeping platform, and benches around the outside that you can sit or sleep on whilst watching the animals go about their business. The whole experience is certainly one none of us will forget. At points it was about as uncomfortable as you can imagine, even if some of our group were adamant the wooden bench they slept on was the African equivalent of memory foam. However, that didn't take anything away from the experience - in fact it's hard to suggest it didn't heighten it. The shared experience of sleeping under the stars and waking up in the jungle is one none of us is likely to repeat again and while some of our friends stayed in the hotel and enjoyed it, they won't be writing a blog post about it any time soon!

[caption id="attachment_381" align="alignright" width="300"]Mole National Park treehouse Fresh-faced after a night in the treehouse[/caption]

Despite it all we'd thoroughly recommend it. You can't put a price on the experience or the laughter that we shared; there are too many private jokes to even list from that night and its antics. In the morning we set off from the treehouse on a walking safari where we stared death in the face as an elephant confronted us and then attacked our guide - but that's another story for another time...

PS. The treehouse costs 30 cedi per person per night, and sleeping mats or mosquito nets can be hired for 3 cedi each. It took us a while to track down the telephone number for the Mole treehouse... send us a message if you would like it!